man and woman hiking with backpacks

5 Ways to Build Your Summer Body Confidence

The skies are clear and blue, the temperatures are on the rise, and outdoor activities are calling your name. There’s no doubt that summer has arrived, and it’s likely that you’re thinking about your fitness routine. Fitness and wellness guru Caroline Jordan has some advice for you: “There is no better time than right now to get started on some serious body love. I encourage you to practice your body love push-ups daily and build your body confidence strength.”

Let’s take a look at some ways you can make Jordan’s advice and your fitness goals your reality this summer:
  1. Hold yourself accountable.

Make a workout schedule and stick to it. Use an app, a fitness tracker, or even just a simple notebook to record your activity. Journal the accomplishments you make. Burn a high number of calories? Increase your speed or your weight load? Feel successful after trying a new exercise? Reflect on these experiences in your journal. Doing so can not only help you see how much you improve from week to week but it can also keep you motivated to do even more.

  1. Appreciate food as fuel.

Eating for comfort may lead you to eat too much, but seeing food as the enemy may cause you to deprive your body of the nutrients it needs. Question your relationship with food and why you make the decisions to eat what you do. Read about the science of nutrition and how different foods can do different things for your body. Do your body a favor by complementing your workout with the fuel it needs; don’t cancel out your efforts by treating yourself to foods that work against your goals.

  1. Try something new.

Is there a dance or fitness or yoga class you’ve always wanted to try? Is there a new sports league forming at your work? Have your friends or coworkers invited you out for a hike or a bike ride? Schedule it, sign up, and say yes! You could find something new that you enjoy and that you want to invest your time in. You could also give your body a chance to surprise you with its ability and strength. Who knows – it could even lead to a new project or a new connection in your professional life.

  1. Build confidence in yourself.

Wouldn’t it be nice if building confidence in yourself were as easy as hanging a motivational poster in your workspace or on your fridge and looking at it every day? Building that confidence and staying motivated to do more for yourself and for your fitness goals take time and concerted effort, but small steps can lead to a significant shift in how you see yourself. Tell yourself how proud you are of your accomplishments every day. If you’re new to fitness and you’ve just committed to climbing the stairs every day instead of taking the elevator, pat yourself on the back. If you’ve walked back into the gym this week or you’re back in the kitchen to do meal prep after a vacation full of treats and time off, give yourself some applause.

  1. Learn how to make your healthcare coverage work for your goals.

Explore your options when it comes to different types of coverage. In addition to major medical coverage, there are short-term medical plans and health benefit insurance plans (commonly known as limited medical coverage) that may help you meet your coverage needs and come with features that help you achieve your health and fitness goals. Check to see if the coverage you choose has the following:

  • Deductibles that meet your budget needs
  • Affordable doctor’s office visits so seeing your doctor is within your budget
  • Mental health coverage to provide resources, support, and/or benefits for you or your covered loved ones in need
  • Wellness initiatives to provide nutrition and/or fitness resources and/or programs
  • Telemedicine feature to provide you with video and/or phone access to doctors when you need it
  • Patient advocacy feature to help you navigate the healthcare system
Here are some features of several different types of coverage to help you decide what works best for you and your goals:

Short-Term Medical Coverage

  • Helpful if you (or a loved one) are facing life-altering transition periods such as pre-Medicare retirement, change in employment status, rolling off parental or student insurance, bridging a gap in major medical coverage or if you missed Open Enrollment (This coverage is designed solely to provide healthcare coverage during unexpected coverage gaps)
  • Flexibility in coverage length and cost (coverage duration varies by state and is non-renewable)
  • Variety of deductible and coinsurance options
  • Low copay options for in-network benefits
  • Limited preventive care available
  • Ability to cancel at any time without penalty (benefits may be limited and subject to exclusions and restrictions)
  • Does not cover pre-existing conditions
  • Coverage is not guaranteed
  • Not intended to be a replacement or alternative to ACA or other major medical plans and does not provide the minimum essential health benefits that are required; may result in a tax penalty.

Health Benefit Insurance Coverage 

  • Helpful if you (or a loved one) are anticipating rising medical expenses, are unable to afford major medical, are not eligible for short-term medical, and/or are looking for supplemental coverage to major medical plans
  • Guaranteed issue coverage if eligibility is met and available in state
  • Premiums often lower than major medical
  • Benefits such as $50-$100 paid toward doctor and specialist visits available
  • Not required to use a network of doctors – freedom to see any doctor or visit any facility of your choice (*Note: you may still exceed eligible benefit)
  • Preventive care available for as low as $50
  • Next day coverage available or little to no waiting periods for accidental injuries or sickness
  • 12 month waiting period for pre-existing conditions (limitations and exclusions may apply)
  • Not a replacement for major medical coverage
  • Does not count as minimum essential coverage required by the Affordable Care Act and is not suitable to serve as sole medical coverage

ACA Coverage

  • Helpful if you (or a loved one) are seeking major medical but may not be able to afford it, have a pre-existing condition, and/or need a broad array of health benefits
  • Option to change plan every year and to stay on policy as long as needed
  • Renews annually
  • Provides coverage for pre-existing conditions; you can’t be rejected based on health
  • Provides preventive care
  • Provides the option for subsidies to lower costs
  • Provides minimum essential health benefits
  • Must enroll during the Open Enrollment period, the Special Enrollment period, or when a qualifying life event occurs

Note: It is important to keep in mind that while short-term and health benefit insurance coverage can provide valuable benefits, neither one is intended to be a replacement nor an alternative to ACA or other major medical plans. These types of coverage do not provide the minimum essential health benefits that are required and will not help to avoid the fee for not carrying health insurance.

 

With our leading edge tools and technologies, we’re upgrading how you experience your choice of coverage.

Stay tuned to our next blog post!

Click here to join our Facebook community for more information about your health and your healthcare coverage.

 

young nurse with an older woman in a wheelchair

Health by the Decade: Creating Health Habits for National Women’s Health Week

Each year during National Women’s Health Week, millions of women take steps to improve their health. The 19th annual National Women’s Health Week kicks off on May 13 and serves as a reminder for women to make our health a priority and to build positive health habits for life.

Our journey to create these health habits can include:
Why should we begin this journey toward improved health?

These steps are the foundation for a lifetime of good health. They can help us be as healthy as possible whether we’re 20 years old or 100 years old! Check out age-personalized tips for lifelong health habits below.

How can you participate in the 19th annual National Women’s Health Week?
  • Learn more about what steps to take for good health
  • Take the National Women’s Health Week quiz to test your knowledge about healthy living
  • Show your friends how you’re making your health a priority with these social media resources and use the #NWHW hashtag
  • Participate online or organize activities within your community or office

Whether you’re in your 20s or your 80s, you can take steps to put yourself on the path to better and long-lasting health. Check out steps we should all take as well as personalized steps for your decade below.

For Every Decade:

*A well-woman visit is a yearly preventive checkup with your doctor. It’s a time to check in on how you’re doing, how you’d like to be doing, and what changes you can make to reach your health goals.

In addition to talking with your doctor or nurse about your health, you may also need certain vaccines (shots) and medical tests.

 For Your 20s

 Talk to your doctor at least once a year about:

  • Whether you plan to have children in the next year or the right birth control
  • Your weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Your tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in your life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Your family health history, especially of heart disease and cancer (these are the top two fatal diseases for women in the United States and are often linked to diet and lifestyle choices)
  • Protecting yourself from the sun and the hazards of tanning

Ask if you need these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • HPV vaccine (26 and younger*)
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Pap (21 and older*)
  • Sexually transmitted infections (including chlamydia and gonorrhea tests for women 24 and younger*)
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

If you are pregnant, prenatal care can also be a well-woman visit. There are also certain tests during pregnancy to check your and your baby’s health. Click here to learn more.

* Suggested by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and may not apply to every person

For Your 30s

Talk to your doctor at least once a year about:

  • Whether you plan to have children in the next year or the right birth control
  • Your weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Your tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in your life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Your family health history, especially of heart disease and cancer (these are the top two fatal diseases for women in the United States and are often linked to diet and lifestyle choices)

Ask if you need these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Pap and HPV
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

If you are pregnant, prenatal care can also be a well-woman visit. There are also certain tests during pregnancy to check your and your baby’s health. Click here to learn more.

For Your 40s

Talk to your doctor at least once a year about:

  •  Whether you plan to have children in the next year or the right birth control (for premenopausal women)
  • Perimenopause symptoms
  • Your weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Your tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in your life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Your family health history, especially of heart disease and cancer (these are the top two fatal diseases for women in the United States and are often linked to diet and lifestyle choices)

Ask if you need these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Mammogram
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Pap and HPV
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

If you are pregnant, prenatal care can also be a well-woman visit. There are also certain tests during pregnancy to check your and your baby’s health. Click here to learn more.

For Your 50s

Talk to your doctor at least once a year about:

  •  Menopause symptoms
  • Your weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Your tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in your life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Your family health history, especially of heart disease and cancer (these are the top two fatal diseases for women in the United States and are often linked to diet and lifestyle choices)

Ask if you need these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Low-dose aspirin
  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Lung cancer (55 and older*)
  • Mammogram
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Pap and HPV
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

* Suggested by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and may not apply to every person

 For Your 60s

Talk to your doctor at least once a year about:

  •  Your weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Your tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in your life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Who will make healthcare decisions for you if you are unable to

Ask if you need these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Low-dose aspirin
  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Lung cancer
  • Mammogram
  • Osteoporosis (65 and older*)
  • Pap and HPV (65 and younger*)
  • Pneumonia
  • Shingles
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

* Suggested by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and may not apply to every person

For Your 70s

Talk to your doctor at least once a year about:

  • Your weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Your tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in your life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Who will make healthcare decisions for you if you are unable to

Ask if you need these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Cholesterol (75 and younger*)
  • Colorectal cancer (75 and younger*)
  • Diabetes (70 and younger*)
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Lung cancer
  • Mammogram (74 and younger*)
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pneumonia
  • Shingles
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

* Suggested by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and may not apply to every person

For Your 80s

Talk to your doctor at least once a year about:

  • Your weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Your tobacco and alcohol use
  • Any violence in your life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Who will make healthcare decisions for you if you are unable to

Ask if you need these tests, medicines, or vaccines:

  • Blood pressure
  • Chickenpox
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • Lung cancer (80 and younger*)
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pneumonia
  • Shingles
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, or whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis

* Suggested by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and may not apply to every person

Many thanks to the Office of Women’s Health for this information and their work on behalf of women.

For more information on National Women’s Health Week as well as resources on a variety of trending topics in women’s health, wellness, and medical conditions, please click here.

With our leading edge tools and technologies, we’re upgrading how you experience your choice of coverage.

Stay tuned to our next blog post!

Click here to join our Facebook community for more information about your health and your healthcare coverage.

 

 

 

 

fitness tracker on arm

Get Moving this May for National Physical Fitness and Sports Month

It’s that time of year again – it’s time to #MoveInMay!

May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, a month dedicated to raising awareness about the benefits of physical activity and asking communities, health professionals, and families to work together to create opportunities for everyone to get more of it.

Consider these stats from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1:

  • About 1 in 5 (21%) adults meet the current physical activity guidelines.
  • Less than 3 in 10 high school students get at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day.
  • Physical activity can improve health. People who are physically active tend to live longer and have lower risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers.
  • Inactive adults have a higher risk for early death, heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers.

Click on the link in the first stat above to learn more about the amount and type of activity the CDC recommends for your optimum health benefits.

While many health coverage options provide a wealth of insurance benefits to help you maintain your health, some plans may also provide additional programs and features that pique your interest:

Access to digital fitness tools

We know that consistent physical activity is a core principle of good health. With tools to help you track your fitness journey, you can integrate personalized health and fitness guidance, including tips on nutrition and self-assessments, into your workout routines. These tools can be included in short-term medical or health benefit insurance coverage.

24/7/365 access to board-certified doctors

Increasing physical activity can have a significant impact on your general health, but you may still suffer from common illnesses, allergies, or infections from time to time. Short-term medical and health benefit insurance coverage can include benefits that allow you to connect with doctors in mere minutes via mobile and video to address health concerns quickly and conveniently.

Patient advocacy service

As you continue to increase your physical activity and fitness levels and make the most of your health coverage, you may need assistance navigating the world of healthcare. As is found with many traditional health insurance plans, short-term medical and health benefit insurance coverage can also include access to a patient advocacy service that can help you schedule appointments, find quality doctors and facilities, lower out-of-pocket costs, and make informed decisions about your healthcare.

Note:  Keep in mind that while short-term and health benefit insurance coverage do provide these non-health benefits, neither one is intended to be a replacement nor an alternative to ACA or other major medical plans. These types of coverage do not provide the minimum essential health benefits that are required and will not help to avoid the fee for not carrying health insurance. They may have restrictions, limitations, and exclusions that impact your coverage.

What are your physical fitness goals? How do you work with your personal healthcare community to make sure you meet them?

 

With our leading edge tools and technologies, we’re upgrading how you experience your choice of coverage.

Stay tuned to our next blog post!

Click here to join our Facebook community for more information about your health and your healthcare coverage.

 

 

Source: “Facts About Physical Activity.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/data/facts.htm